Good Cholesterol
SpiritSpring - it feels good to feel better
RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

PYROLURIA: PYROLE DISORDER (PD)
Candida
NADA’s AcuDetox for D&A Abstinence
Rural Vets Seek Homemaker Benefit
Alternative Health Benefits for Vets

Categories

Aromatherapy
Cardiovascular
DIY
Endocinology
Epidemiology
Gastrointestinal
Healthcare Reform
Herbology
Immunology
Musculoskeletal
Neurological
Nutrition
OB/GYN
Oncology
Pharmacology
Primary Care & Prevention
Psycho-Spiritual
Psyco-Spiritual
Respiratory
Reviews
Supplements
supplements, probiotics
powered by

My Blog

Good Cholesterol

High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) is the "good" cholesterol. HDL and triglycerides (TG) are most responsive to exercise. While TG level is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), increasing your HDL level is like getting free brownie points. A HDL >40 mg/dl is desirable, but a HDL >60 mg/dL counts as a “negative” risk factor. Meaning it removes one CHD risk factor from the total count (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2003). 

The ATP III Cholesterol Guideline recommendations for low HDL  plus elevated TG are (1) intense weight management, and (2) increased physical activity (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2003). The Dietary Guidelines for Americans (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2010) recommendation for exercise (adults ages 18-64) is minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week or 75 minutes of high intensity physical activity per week. 

Lowering both HDL and TG may decrease the need for a multi-drug regimen to manage mixed dyslipidemia (elevated total cholesterol, elevated LDL, elevated TG, and low HDL). Combination therapy increases the risk for adverse reactions from any one drug individually (Edmunds & Mayhew, 2013). The ATP III Cholesterol Guideline (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2003) provides information to assists in choosing drug therapy to increase HDL and lower TG:

  • Statins increase HDL by 5% to 15%; and lower TG by 7% to 30%.
  • Bile acid sequestrants increase HDL by 35 to 5%, but do not change TG level and are contraindicated when TG is >200 mg/dL.  
  • Nicotinic acid increases HDL by 15 to 35%; and decrease TG by 20-50%.
  • Fibric acids increase HDL by 15 to 20%; decrease TG by 20-50%
 
While HDL and TG are important, the combination of LDL, blood pressure, and HDL (plus certain risk factors such as diabetes) remain the major predictors of CHD in older adults (Dunphy, Winland-Brown, Porter, Thomas, 2011). See Stratified Risk for CHD. See other Cardiovacular blogs.
 

References
Dunphy, L., Winland-Brown, J., Porter, B., Thomas, D. (2011). Primary care: The art and science of advanced practice nursing. Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis Company.

Edmunds, M., & Mayhew, M. (2013). Pharmacology for the primary care provider (4th ed). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. (2003). ATP III cholesterol guidelines at a glance. Retrieved from http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cholesterol/atglance.pdf.

U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2010). Dietary guidelines for Americans 2010. Retrieved from http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2010/DietaryGuidelines2010.pdf.



















0 Comments to Good Cholesterol:

Comments RSS

Add a Comment

Your Name:
Email Address: (Required)
Website:
Comment:
Make your text bigger, bold, italic and more with HTML tags. We'll show you how.
Post Comment
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint